TYPE II TYPE 2 MEXICO 1991 OnZa LIBERTAD KM-493.4

I have searched the Internet for an explanation about this variety. Let me add that my search hasn’t been that long or extremely arduous but I did make an attempt. The best explanation I heard was from a guy named Dave from Baja Numismatics. I met him for the first time at the Arlington Texas show in May 2016 when I asked to look through his stock. He was just setting up, and was kind enough to let me take a peek through his Onza boxes for sale. It’s usually best to let the dealer set up as they can get cranky, and I’m not talking about Dave. I’m talking about me when I would set up. Lol

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He handed me the first box, and I looked through multiple years. Then the second box, and spotted the Type I 1991 ONZA and Type II 1991 OnZa tabs in order. The 1991 Type I’s were too banged up for me to buy a single one. However, I scored a couple 1991 Type II’s, and kept moving along to the next few years which I thought were attractive. I picked two 2000’s, a few 2004’s, couple 2005’s, and two 2006’s. Then I picked up a very colorful 2003 2 Oz which I thought was very nicely toned.

I asked if he had any 1998’s since the first one I ever bought luckily graded MS 69 by NGC. He mentioned he had sold the better of the two 1998’s recently, and the other coin was at home in New Mexico. He looked at what I picked out, mentioned the 1991 Type II OnZa’s were only found in these sets, and the reason for the revamped die design is unknown.

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The purported mintage he mentioned to me was 50,000 sets, and I think he mentioned that the 1991 Type II OnZa may be tougher to get than the 1998 Onza. This was all new information to me. I had some idea the variety was worth more but how much more I wasn’t really sure but I took the risk. From what Dave mentioned to me I concluded the only way to get the Type II 1991 OnZa is by breaking up a 1991 mint set of five coins.

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Why the die design was switched to strike mint sets remains a mystery that maybe someone out there has an answer to share. Possibly there is no explanation for the switch from ONZA to OnZa for the year of 1991. We do know that the Mexican Mint did switch to the Type II 1991 OnZA design for the 1992 mintage, and sequential mintages up until 1995. Then the design completely changes as we know to the new “Winged Liberty” until present day 2016 when this was written.

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I’m fairly certain the 1991 Type II OnZas were not issued in mint rolls as the 1991 Type I ONZA. I have yet to see a Type II 1991 mint issued roll on eBay, and I could be completely wrong. However this was written to support the theory that only 50,000 OnZa 1991 Type II were issued and let’s take a look at the population reports.

NGC POPULATION REPORT AS OF 08/12/16 FOR THE 1991 TYPE II ONZA KM-494.3

MS 63 MS 64 Ms 65 MS 66 MS 67 MS 68 MS 69 MS 70
0          0           1           2         13          8          2         0

PCGS POPULATION REPORT AS OF 08/12/16 FOR THE 1991 TYPE II ONZA KM-494.3

MS 63 MS 64 Ms 65 MS 66 MS 67 MS 68 MS 69 MS 70
1           1          0           0          2          10         5         0

There are a total of only 45 graded 1991 Type II OnZa coins graded by both companies as of 08/12/16. In comparison to the 1998 business strike that has a low mintage of 67,000 the 1991 Type II may possibly be harder to obtain that the 1998 OnZa. Only time will tell.

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I have also discounted the fact that more may be submitted of either date in the future. Anything is possible with coins but conversely some of these coins may have been melted as well at anytime. These are unknowns and we can base some type of logical conclusion by what data is available today.

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Prices fluctuate with demand as markets may remain unpredictable. More supply may enter the marketplace at anytime to suppress prices or supply may not be available and prices may stay firm or rise. The science of trying to pinpoint prices may drive a person crazy as it’s not exact with many changing variables at anytime.

“Past prices don’t indicate future performance” is a common catch phrase used amongst those that sell financial products such as mutual funds within the investment industry. Which is true and collectibles function somewhat in the same manner. What’s hot today may not be hot tomorrow. Or. Vice versa.

Thanks for reading my thoughts, and enjoy the day.

Sincerely,

Sanjay